Max Müller: Es gibt keine Dummheit mehr

Max Müller:
Es gibt keine Dummheit mehr

 

Max Müller: Es gibt keine Dummheit mehr

 

Opening

Saturday 11.7. 19.00

Opening hours

Sunday 12.7. until Wednesday 15.7., 14.00 – 18.00

 

Gitte Bohr − Club für Kunst und politisches Denken
C/O WestGermany
Skalitzer Straße 133, 2nd floor (entrance next to Effendi Optik)
U1 & U8: Kottbusser Tor

Power, love, beauty, sex. Suffering and passion. Big themes dominate the realist visual language of Max Müller. With pencils and pens, he draws on cardboard, scrap paper, or he paints in the classical way with acrylics on canvas. He works on different media, but always with intensity; here playful, there gloomy and severe. With a powerful line, Müller transposes that which catches his eye without optical aids (that is no exception in this genre). He does this work with the same insight that also emanates from the realism of his song texts. As singer and text writer of the band Mutter, he brings his observations unvarnished and directly onto paper. He works in the same way as painter and draughtsman. The particular in this connection is that the world of images on which he draws, as were he drawing from nature, is the world of two-dimensional images. In doing so, it is unimportant to him whether his images conform exactly to reality. Distortions, doubled images, retouches, corrections are perhaps not always planned, but are intentionally left untouched. Discrepancies, distortions and errors co-determine the finished work.

Max Müller

 

Max Müller draws on image categories, which always already are part of the established image regimes: always mediated, his motifs are in one way or another part of the public sphere. Sometimes they are vulgar and endlessly reproduced, but Müller wrings atmosphere from every image and reanimates it, no matter how dead. The strength of his manner of painting corresponds hereby to the intensity of his vision. Next to the images one could write: known from film and TV. They are images about which everyone has an opinion. Images of war, inherently in conflict with their own claims to realism, turn into beautiful landscapes and seascapes, fed by the universe of documentaries, which continuously devalues itself. The film stars from yesterday; they are icons, they are masks, but are they also humans? Or are they merely projection screens for beauty, glamour and big feelings – the more inaccessible the better? Suddenly, we see them uncomfortably close by, when the stars of the old UfA from the Nazi era pop up, or disagreeable personalities of the current establishment. Where the images of women, whether they are Hollywood or porn, remind us of the loneliness of the (male) spectator, the act of making images itself almost becomes a weapon, when the aim is to resist the attack of the banal. Helmut Schmidt, the man with the licence to smoke, reproduced a thousand times in various poses, points to the image regime that hegemonises public opinion. Here appears again the same question, but upside down: there, that which is unapproachable and far, advances into intimate proximity; here, on the other hand, the omnipresent recedes into the distance – the beyond booms where the belief in the here and now disintegrates.

Max Müller

 

Max Müller was born in 1962 in Wolfsburg and played in various punk bands (Honkas, Camping Sex). He is well-known as the frontman of the influential rock band Mutter, which was founded in 1986. Müller is a versatile artist, who works as solo-artist, as well as with film and theatre, and as writer. Gitte Bohr is very pleased to be able to present a solo-exhibition, giving an insight into Max Müller’s work as a visual artist. Recently, he made the illustrations for the new book by Tex Rubinowitz "Irma."