Franziska Wildt - Die innere Front

Franziska Wildt - Die innere Front

Opening: Thursday, November 10, 19H

Exhibition: November 11 - 26, 2011
Thursday - Saturday 14 - 18H

Franziska Wildt - Installation shots

Installation shots

As Franziska Wildt was investigating the history of a studio at the Universität der Künste in Berlin (Room 58), which was across from the studio of Arno Breker, she came across the story of the couple Schumacher and their fellow students Oda Schottmöller and Fritz Cremer. They were students of visual art at the then Charlottenburger Vereinigten Staatsschulen für Freie und Angewandte Kunst. From 1932, their studio served as "letter box" for the circle around the anti-fascist magazine "Gegner" (opponent), to which also Harro Schulze-Boysen belonged. Together with him and several others, the art students belonged to the later Schulze-Boysen/ Harnack circle, which was part of the resistance movement that was named "Rote Kapelle" (red orchestra) by the Gestapo. The Schumacher couple and many of their friends and colleagues were arrested by the Gestapo and executed, and a large part of their artworks were destroyed.

Franziska Wildt - Installation shots

Installation shots

Franziska Wildt has reconstructed a carpet design by Elisabeth Schumacher from copies of the pamphlet "Innere Front" (inner front) and has worked with one of the few still existing works by Kurt Schumacher, the bronze with the ambiguous title "Fallender" (one who falls) from 1931. Drawings in the colour Prussian Blue remind one of the usage of its main element, iron hexacyanoferrate, in Zyklon B. Quotes and sources encounter each other: a glass with evaporated salt water standing on a plinth, Paul Celan's poem Black Milk, reports from captivity, miniature pamphlets the size of stamps, a poem written by Ingeborg Bachmann in her youth, and a painting of ruins by Peter Weiss are connected. With sensitivity and subtle cross references, Franziska Wildt draws an image of a destroyed artist generation.